Breastfeeding Medicine

Physicians blogging about breastfeeding

Archive for the ‘Members’ Category

On finding #MyPeopleABM: Physicians share what ABM means to them

with one comment

Jennifer Caplan, MD, FAAP, IBCLC
North Scottsdale Pediatric Associates, AZ USA
I joined ABM after going to an AAP conference in 2008 with my nursing baby. At the conference, I ended up spending almost the entire time with the Section on Breastfeeding because my baby was not interested in staying with my husband—so I brought her with me. And I felt more comfortable hanging out with the breastfeeding crowd. I ended up riding in an elevator with some of the organizers and one of the women told me I should join ABM.

I had been so energized by the discussions at that conference—learning how to do frenotomies, hearing about the “Ban the Bag” efforts in Massachusetts, finding out about Baby Friendly Hospitals for the first time. So, I joined ABM and attended my first conference in 2009.

Being at an ABM conference is amazing. I’m really not a conference person—networking does not come easily to me, I don’t really like the marketing/advertising hall, but I do love learning about new things. ABM is the only conference I really enjoy going to. I always come away from the conference with at least a dozen new ways to practice and a new energy to spread my knowledge to others. And I love the people I meet at ABM conferences—so many perspectives, so many different ways they express their passion for supporting the mother-baby dyad. After another couple conferences, I had been convinced to become a lactation consultant.

I usually make it to the ABM conference, but even in years where I don’t go, I still get a lot out of my membership. I probably use the protocols more than anything else—always the most up to date, comprehensive source on breastfeeding topics. I enjoy seeing the new research coming out in the journals. And just knowing I’m a part of an amazing group that is a political force for advancing breastfeeding and advocating for women is important to me. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by drmilkarizona

May 5, 2017 at 5:06 pm

ABM Gold Member Profile: Touraj Shafai, MD, PhD, FAAP, FABM

leave a comment »

ABM: Why did you become a member of ABM?

Medical Director, Inland Empire Children's Medical Group and BF Clinic

Touraj Shafai, MD, PhD, FAAP, FABM Medical Director, Inland Empire Children’s Medical Group and BF Clinic

Shafai: To improve my knowledge about benefits of breastfeeding to both mother and baby and to society.

ABM: What is ABM‘s greatest strength?

ShafaiAs an organization ABM has the greatest collection of knowledge than any other organization.

ABM: What inspires you to promote, protect and support breastfeeding?

Shafai:  To educate moms regarding the benefits of breastfeeding so our newborns can achieve their fullest potential.

ABM: What advice can you offer to physicians who are interested in learning more about breastfeeding?

Shafai: To become a member of the ABM and attend the Annual Meetings of the Academy.

ABM: What accomplishment are you most proud of in your career?

Shafai: To receive a PhD in biochemistry following my MD degree which provided me with critical thinking and gave me the tools in research and improving patient care.

ABM: What is a current challenge for you in your work?

Shafai: To get rid of some of the hospital policies such as the old hypoglycemia and jaundice policies that are obstacles to breastfeeding.

ABM: What can ABM offer physicians worldwide?

Shafai: Many pediatric residents and medical students express a desire to learn more about breastfeeding. Unfortunately this is not available in their training programs. We should be able to fill this gap and provide them with the information that they need.

Thank you, Dr. Shafai.  We look forward to featuring additional Lifetime and Gold Members on the ABM Blog each month.

Join us at the 19th Annual International Meeting to be held November 13-16, 2014 in Cleveland, OH, USA.

Written by bfmed

January 29, 2014 at 12:11 pm

ABM Gold Member Profile: Anne M. Montgomery, MD, FABM

leave a comment »

Anne Montgomery, MD

Anne Montgomery, MD, FABM
Associate Director
Family Medicine Residency
Eisenhower Medical Center

ABM: Why did you become a member of ABM?

Montgomery: I was very involved in breastfeeding support and wanted to be part of a group of similar physicians.

ABM: What is ABM‘s greatest strength?

MontgomeryThe diversity and expertise of our members.

ABM: What inspires you to promote, protect and support breastfeeding?

Montgomery:  Like many people, I was a “mainstream breastfeeding supporter” til I had my son; breastfeeding him exclusively for 5.5 months then continuing for 4.5 years “radicalized” me. I recognized that not not everyone had the tenacity/stubbornness to overcome all the barriers. As a physician to mothers and babies, it was part of my responsibility to be sure that all babies had the opportunity to be breastfed and that all mothers were supported in their feeding choices.

ABM: What advice can you offer to physicians who are interested in learning more about breastfeeding?

MontgomeryJoin ABM! Don’t be afraid to attend courses aimed at nurses and lactation consultants if that is all that is available in your area.

ABM: What accomplishment are you most proud of in your career?

Montgomery: I achieved full professor academic rank in my late 40’s and have taught many residents and students about family medicine including breastfeeding.

ABM: What is a current challenge for you in your work?

Montgomery: Starting a new job soon, I don’t know what to expect yet! A brand new family medicine residency program should be interesting.

ABM: What can ABM offer physicians worldwide?

Montgomery: A chance to network with other like-minded physicians, good breastfeeding education, and support for their work assisting mothers and babies.

Thank you, Dr. Montgomery.  We look forward to featuring additional Lifetime and Gold Members on the ABM Blog each month.

Join us at the 18th Annual International Meeting to be held November 21-24, 2013 in Philadelphia.

ABM-Save-the-Date-web (2)

Written by bfmed

August 28, 2013 at 9:11 am

ABM Gold Member Profile: Lori Feldman-Winter, MD, MPH, FABM

with one comment

Dr. Lori Feldman-Winter

Lori Feldman-Winter, MD, MPH, FABM
Professor of Pediatrics
Children’s Regional Hospital at Cooper, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University

ABM: Why did you become a member of ABM?

Feldman-Winter: I wanted opportunities to network with colleagues that had a shared interest and learn from others work.

ABM: What is ABM‘s greatest strength?

Feldman-WinterThe members are definitely what makes this organization special. Each member makes their own unique contributions and we all learn from each other.

ABM: What inspires you to promote, protect and support breastfeeding?

Feldman-Winter:  For too many years breastfeeding fell outside the realm of mainstream medicine and physicians were unprepared to support mothers decisions to breastfeed. Through organizations such as ABM physicians are much more knowledgeable and skillful in their support, but we still have a long way to go!

ABM: What advice can you offer to physicians who are interested in learning more about breastfeeding?

Feldman-WinterFirst take courses, especially those geared for physicians such as the WEPNTKAB course. Then join organizations such as the ABM to gain a better understanding of the field from the physicians’ perspective. Then get involved, there are so many opportunities to make a real difference.

ABM: What accomplishment are you most proud of in your career?

Feldman-Winter: I have dedicated a large part of my career in breastfeeding medicine to physician education. Being part of the inaugural group of FABM’s is one of the highlights of my career.

ABM: What is a current challenge for you in your work?

Feldman-Winter: In my current work as a consultant to NICHQ Best Fed Beginnings Project, my biggest challenge is to convince physicians all over the country that they need to make changes, including getting the required education, to help their hospitals achieve Baby-Friendly designation. The resistance to change is sometimes overwhelming. Somehow we need to convince all physicians to acknowledge that we all have much to learn about breastfeeding, and that it is a vital component of healthcare.

ABM: What can ABM offer physicians worldwide?

Feldman-Winter: The clinical protocols are helpful to set a global agenda for optimal evidence based care.

Thank you, Dr. Feldman-Winter.  We look forward to featuring additional Lifetime and Gold Members on the ABM Blog each week.

Join us at the 18th Annual International Meeting to be held November 21-24, 2013 in Philadelphia.

ABM-Save-the-Date-web (2)

ABM Lifetime Member Profile: Nancy E. Wight, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP

with 2 comments

Nancy Wight

Nancy E. Wight, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP, San Diego Neonatology, Inc. Medical Director, Sharp HealthCare Lactation Services

ABM: Why did you become a member of ABM?

Wight: I was inspired by the quality and vision of the founding members and wanted to be a part of the journey.

ABM: What is ABM‘s greatest strength?

WightIt’s members and all they do in so many arenas (clinical care, research, teaching, mentoring, health planning, etc. etc.)!

ABM: What inspires you to promote, protect and support breastfeeding?

Wight:  As a physician, I care about the health of my community in all its forms and breastfeeding is the best health insurance.

ABM: What advice can you offer to physicians who are interested in learning more about breastfeeding?

WightJoin ABM, join ILCA, join your local breastfeeding coalition. Find a breastfeeding ‘champion’ in your area to act as a mentor for you.

ABM: What accomplishment are you most proud of in your career?

Wight: I am most proud of the fact that as a clinician and educator I have influenced others to follow in my footsteps and EXCEED my accomplishments.

ABM: What is a current challenge for you in your work?

Wight: Keeping up with the incredible increase in human lactation research and literature over the last 10 years while working full-time (including nights!) as an ‘elder’ clinical neonatologist.

ABM: What can ABM offer physicians worldwide?

Wight: A vast wealth of peer knowledge and support.

Thank you, Dr. Wight.  We look forward to featuring additional Lifetime and Gold Members on the ABM Blog each week.

Join us at the 18th Annual International Meeting to be held November 21-24, 2013 in Philadelphia.

ABM-Save-the-Date-web (2)

ABM Gold Member Profile: Featuring Paula K. Schreck, MD

with one comment

ABM: Why did you become a member of ABM?

Paula K. Schreck, MD Breastfeeding Coordinator St. John Providence Health System

Paula K. Schreck, MD
Breastfeeding Coordinator
St. John Providence Health System

Schreck: I became a member of ABM as I first began building my career in Breastfeeding Medicine. The promise of fellowship with other like-minded MD’s was compelling as was the access to up-to-date science and information.

ABM: What is ABM‘s greatest strength?

Schreck: ABM’s greatest strength is its membership.

ABM: What inspires you to promote, protect and support breastfeeding?

Schreck:  The palpable difference in the health of the breastfeeding mother and baby dyad motivates and inspires me in my work.

ABM: What advice can you offer to physicians who are interested in learning more about breastfeeding?

SchreckStart by attending an ABM Annual Meeting.

ABM: What accomplishment are you most proud of in your career?

Schreck: My greatest accomplishment is the creation of my outpatient breastfeeding clinic. Its success has brought breastfeeding into the spotlight in my hospital system.

ABM: What is a current challenge for you in your work?

Schreck: Taking four hospitals through Baby-Friendly at the same time.

ABM: What can ABM offer physicians worldwide?

Schreck: Inspiration, information, and fellowship.

Thank you, Dr. Schreck.  We look forward to featuring additional Lifetime and Gold Members on the ABM Blog each week.

Join us at the 18th Annual International Meeting to be held November 21-24, 2013 in Philadelphia.

ABM-Save-the-Date-web (2)

Written by bfmed

July 12, 2013 at 11:39 am

How a Surgeon Ended up in ABM

with 10 comments

Surgeons are often Type A personalities, the ones who sit in the front of the class, who volunteer for everything, who stay scrubbed in the OR all day with appendicitis and do a post-op check before checking themselves into the emergency department (yes, that was me.) As such, surgeons are often dismissive of the subspecialty of breast surgery. The surgeries are not as complex as cardiac bypass surgery or Whipple procedures for pancreatic cancer. In fact, it’s often a rotation for interns. I was a Type A personality. I had no plans to do breast surgery.

Then, a funny thing happened. I had my first son during residency. Planned with military precision, of course, to coincide with the beginning of my designated research years, as I had hoped to squeeze another baby in there somewhere. After his birth, I would breastfeed, because that is what Type A mothers do these days. It’s the best! Of course, I would do the best! However, like many mothers out there, we had an incredibly rocky start. Poor latch with inadequate weight gain. Triple feeding with pumped milk. Cracked nipples leading to mastitis. As a Type A person, I threw myself into research in an effort to solve the problems. Not just the many, many baby books out there, but Medline searches on breastfeeding management. I learned more than I ever had in my surgery textbooks about the breast, the physiology of lactation that is both incredibly simple and enormously complex, and most importantly, miraculous. I was reminded constantly in my reading of the importance of preserving this ability to breastfeed my son, for his and my health, and how challenging that could be.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by sntierney

October 16, 2012 at 7:55 am