Breastfeeding Medicine

Physicians blogging about breastfeeding

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ABM Ethics Committee Formal Grievance Review is Ongoing

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November 9, 2017 – The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine has a formal process in place to address any member grievances, including potential conflict of interests. These routine procedures are outlined in our bylaws and our Code of Ethics. Both documents are available to all with no restricted access at www.bfmed.org.

Last week, the grievance review process was activated. Today, the Board of Directors discussed this ongoing matter in person at the regularly scheduled board meeting.

The Ethics Committee is actively reviewing ABM’s Conflict of Interest policies. The results of this policy review and any recommendations will be shared with membership following the January meeting of Board.

 

 

Written by bfmed

November 9, 2017 at 7:45 pm

Posted in ethics, Uncategorized

CDC issues guidelines on breastfeeding and Ebola

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Both families and physicians are anxious about the potential impact of the Ebola virus for mothers and infants.

The CDC has recently issued guidelines for field and partner organizations regarding how to advise breastfeeding women with probably or confirmed Ebola infection:

“When safe alternatives to breastfeeding and infant care exist, mothers with probable or confirmed Ebola virus disease should not have close contact with their infants (including breastfeeding).

In resource-limited settings, non-breastfed infants are at increased risk of death from starvation and other infectious diseases. These risks must be carefully weighed against the risk of Ebola virus disease.”

The Ebola virus has been detected in the milk of infected women. For mothers who recover from Ebola, it is not known when it is safe to resume breastfeeding. The CDC recommends waiting to resume breastfeeding until milk can be shown to be Ebola-free in laboratory testing.

As the Ebola outbreak continues to evolve, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine recommends consulting CDC guidance on how to minimize risk for infants of affected mothers.

Written by bfmed

October 30, 2014 at 7:26 am

ABM Gold Member Profile: Touraj Shafai, MD, PhD, FAAP, FABM

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ABM: Why did you become a member of ABM?

Medical Director, Inland Empire Children's Medical Group and BF Clinic

Touraj Shafai, MD, PhD, FAAP, FABM Medical Director, Inland Empire Children’s Medical Group and BF Clinic

Shafai: To improve my knowledge about benefits of breastfeeding to both mother and baby and to society.

ABM: What is ABM‘s greatest strength?

ShafaiAs an organization ABM has the greatest collection of knowledge than any other organization.

ABM: What inspires you to promote, protect and support breastfeeding?

Shafai:  To educate moms regarding the benefits of breastfeeding so our newborns can achieve their fullest potential.

ABM: What advice can you offer to physicians who are interested in learning more about breastfeeding?

Shafai: To become a member of the ABM and attend the Annual Meetings of the Academy.

ABM: What accomplishment are you most proud of in your career?

Shafai: To receive a PhD in biochemistry following my MD degree which provided me with critical thinking and gave me the tools in research and improving patient care.

ABM: What is a current challenge for you in your work?

Shafai: To get rid of some of the hospital policies such as the old hypoglycemia and jaundice policies that are obstacles to breastfeeding.

ABM: What can ABM offer physicians worldwide?

Shafai: Many pediatric residents and medical students express a desire to learn more about breastfeeding. Unfortunately this is not available in their training programs. We should be able to fill this gap and provide them with the information that they need.

Thank you, Dr. Shafai.  We look forward to featuring additional Lifetime and Gold Members on the ABM Blog each month.

Join us at the 19th Annual International Meeting to be held November 13-16, 2014 in Cleveland, OH, USA.

Written by bfmed

January 29, 2014 at 12:11 pm

Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine urges AAP to end formula marketing partnership

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New Rochelle, NY, December 27, 2013—The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine today asked the American Academy of Pediatrics to end its formula marketing relationship with Mead Johnson.

“AAP participation in formula marketing undermines consensus medical recommendations for exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and is harmful to the health of mothers and infants,” wrote Wendy Brodribb, president of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. “We urge the AAP to discontinue this relationship with Mead Johnson.”

In an email message to members of the AAP’s Section on Breastfeeding, AAP President Thomas McInerny stated, “The inclusion of formula in hospital discharge bags, along with the AAP educational materials Mead Johnson purchased, has sparked considerable discussion. The Academy has initiated conversations with Mead Johnson to ensure the AAP is not connected with distribution of formula samples in the future.”

The ABM executive committee urged the AAP to set strict guidelines regarding formula marketing, stating, “We further urge the AAP leadership to implement a formal policy prohibiting Academy participation in direct-to-consumer marketing of formula.”

As reported last week in The New York Times, the AAP has contracted with Mead Johnson to provide educational materials for the formula manufacturer’s hospital discharge bags. Rigorous studies have found that mothers who receive bags containing formula samples and coupons introduce formula earlier than mothers who receive non-commercial information.

Furthermore, families who plan to formula feed from the start perceive the brand-name discharge bags as an endorsement from their health care provider, leading them to spend hundreds of dollars on pricey brand-name formula, rather than equivalent generic products.

“Concern about these harmful effects of formula marketing has led two thirds of America’s 45 top hospitals to discontinue formula advertising in their maternity wards,” Dr. Wendy Brodribb, ABM President wrote. “It is therefore deeply troubling that the AAP has contracted with Mead Johnson to support this practice.”

Written by bfmed

December 27, 2013 at 2:01 pm

ABM Executive Committee urges AAP to discontinue formula marketing relationship

with 14 comments

Thomas K. McInerny, President, American Academy of Pediatrics

Dr. McInerny:

We are writing on behalf of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM), a multispecialty worldwide organization of physicians dedicated to the support, promotion and protection of breastfeeding and the education of our fellow physicians, to urge the American Academy of Pediatrics to discontinue its participation in infant formula marketing in maternity hospitals and pediatric practices.

It has come to our attention that the AAP has contracted with Mead Johnson to provide AAP-branded materials as part of the formula manufacturer’s maternity discharge pack. Such discharge packs have been shown in randomized controlled trials to reduce breastfeeding duration and exclusivity. Based on this Level I evidence, UNICEF, the World Health Organization, the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, the American Public Health Association, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the United States Surgeon General oppose infant formula marketing in health care settings. Concern about these harmful effects of formula marketing has led two-thirds of America’s 45 top hospitals to discontinue formula advertising in their maternity wards. It is therefore deeply troubling that the AAP has contracted with Mead Johnson to support this practice.

The AAP’s decision to contract with Mead Johnson also violates multiple AAP policy statements. Distribution of discharge packs has been identified as detrimental to exclusivity and duration of breastfeeding in the AAPs Policy Statement on Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk.  In its resolution on Divesting from Formula Marketing in Pediatric Care, the Academy advises pediatricians not to provide formula marketing materials to parents of newborns and infants. Both the AAP’s Sample Hospital Breastfeeding Policy for Newborns and  ABM’s Model Breastfeeding Policy prohibit provision of formula marketing materials to mothers.

AAP participation in formula marketing undermines consensus medical recommendations for exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and is harmful to the health of mothers and infants. We urge the AAP to discontinue this relationship with Mead Johnson. We further urge the AAP leadership to implement a formal policy prohibiting Academy participation in direct-to-consumer marketing of formula or formula company materials.

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Dr. Wendy Brodribb,  President (Family Physician)

Dr. Arthur Eidelman,  Immediate Past President (Pediatrician)

Dr. Julie Taylor,  President-Elect (Family Physician)

Dr. Tim Tobolic, Treasurer (Family Physician)

Dr. Kathie Marinelli,  Secretary (Pediatrician)

cc. Dr. Kinga Szucs, ABM representative to SoB AAP

Written by bfmed

December 26, 2013 at 11:26 am

Posted in Uncategorized

ABM Gold Member Profile: Anne M. Montgomery, MD, FABM

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Anne Montgomery, MD

Anne Montgomery, MD, FABM
Associate Director
Family Medicine Residency
Eisenhower Medical Center

ABM: Why did you become a member of ABM?

Montgomery: I was very involved in breastfeeding support and wanted to be part of a group of similar physicians.

ABM: What is ABM‘s greatest strength?

MontgomeryThe diversity and expertise of our members.

ABM: What inspires you to promote, protect and support breastfeeding?

Montgomery:  Like many people, I was a “mainstream breastfeeding supporter” til I had my son; breastfeeding him exclusively for 5.5 months then continuing for 4.5 years “radicalized” me. I recognized that not not everyone had the tenacity/stubbornness to overcome all the barriers. As a physician to mothers and babies, it was part of my responsibility to be sure that all babies had the opportunity to be breastfed and that all mothers were supported in their feeding choices.

ABM: What advice can you offer to physicians who are interested in learning more about breastfeeding?

MontgomeryJoin ABM! Don’t be afraid to attend courses aimed at nurses and lactation consultants if that is all that is available in your area.

ABM: What accomplishment are you most proud of in your career?

Montgomery: I achieved full professor academic rank in my late 40’s and have taught many residents and students about family medicine including breastfeeding.

ABM: What is a current challenge for you in your work?

Montgomery: Starting a new job soon, I don’t know what to expect yet! A brand new family medicine residency program should be interesting.

ABM: What can ABM offer physicians worldwide?

Montgomery: A chance to network with other like-minded physicians, good breastfeeding education, and support for their work assisting mothers and babies.

Thank you, Dr. Montgomery.  We look forward to featuring additional Lifetime and Gold Members on the ABM Blog each month.

Join us at the 18th Annual International Meeting to be held November 21-24, 2013 in Philadelphia.

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Written by bfmed

August 28, 2013 at 9:11 am

ABM Gold Member Profile: Lori Feldman-Winter, MD, MPH, FABM

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Dr. Lori Feldman-Winter

Lori Feldman-Winter, MD, MPH, FABM
Professor of Pediatrics
Children’s Regional Hospital at Cooper, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University

ABM: Why did you become a member of ABM?

Feldman-Winter: I wanted opportunities to network with colleagues that had a shared interest and learn from others work.

ABM: What is ABM‘s greatest strength?

Feldman-WinterThe members are definitely what makes this organization special. Each member makes their own unique contributions and we all learn from each other.

ABM: What inspires you to promote, protect and support breastfeeding?

Feldman-Winter:  For too many years breastfeeding fell outside the realm of mainstream medicine and physicians were unprepared to support mothers decisions to breastfeed. Through organizations such as ABM physicians are much more knowledgeable and skillful in their support, but we still have a long way to go!

ABM: What advice can you offer to physicians who are interested in learning more about breastfeeding?

Feldman-WinterFirst take courses, especially those geared for physicians such as the WEPNTKAB course. Then join organizations such as the ABM to gain a better understanding of the field from the physicians’ perspective. Then get involved, there are so many opportunities to make a real difference.

ABM: What accomplishment are you most proud of in your career?

Feldman-Winter: I have dedicated a large part of my career in breastfeeding medicine to physician education. Being part of the inaugural group of FABM’s is one of the highlights of my career.

ABM: What is a current challenge for you in your work?

Feldman-Winter: In my current work as a consultant to NICHQ Best Fed Beginnings Project, my biggest challenge is to convince physicians all over the country that they need to make changes, including getting the required education, to help their hospitals achieve Baby-Friendly designation. The resistance to change is sometimes overwhelming. Somehow we need to convince all physicians to acknowledge that we all have much to learn about breastfeeding, and that it is a vital component of healthcare.

ABM: What can ABM offer physicians worldwide?

Feldman-Winter: The clinical protocols are helpful to set a global agenda for optimal evidence based care.

Thank you, Dr. Feldman-Winter.  We look forward to featuring additional Lifetime and Gold Members on the ABM Blog each week.

Join us at the 18th Annual International Meeting to be held November 21-24, 2013 in Philadelphia.

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